What is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but are not high enough to be considered for a diagnoses of diabetes. People with prediabetes are at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes and for heart disease and stroke. Other names for prediabetes are impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose.

In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes; this is up from 79 million in 2010

People with prediabetes are likely to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years.

Can Prediabetes Be Prevented?

Studies have shown that people with prediabetes can prevent or delay the development of Type 2 diabetes by 58%. Changes in lifestyle can help. These lifestyle changes include but not limited to:

  • Modest weight loss (by 5-10%)

  • Regular exercise or physical activity (30 minutes daily) at least 5 days a week.

 


How Do I Find Out If I Have Pre-Diabetes?

There are two types of glucose (blood Sugar) tests that are used to tell if you have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Both test require a fasting period.

I. Fasting Blood Glucose Test

Pre-Diabetes glucose level = 100-125 mg/dl

II. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Involves a special glucose drink and a blood test done two hours later.

Normal glucose level = is 139 mg/dl or below

Pre-diabetes glucose level = 140 - 199 mg/dl

It is normal for testing to be repeated to confirm diagnosis. Visit your doctor or healthcare professional to obtain a fasting blood test or glucose tolerance test to tell if you have diabetes or pre-diabetes.

To learn more about Prediabetes, please feel free to visit the Mayo Clinic webpage. 

 

Are You At Risk?

Studies have shown that people with prediabetes can prevent or delay the development of Type 2 diabetes by 58%. Changes in lifestyle can help. These lifestyle changes include but not limited to:

  • Modest weight loss (by 5-10%)

  • Regular exercise or physical activity (30 minutes daily) at least 5 days a week.

  • Getting started today in these areas can help reduce blood sugar levels.

 

     Take the Centers for Disease control and Prevention Risk test found below to find out if you are at risk for Prediabetes. If you are, contact your health care provider to find out more information.